La rentrée: official relapse and déjà vus

Bummer. So I had my first official relapse in less than three years after my diagnosis. I don’t really remember how this goal came up. I think I read or was told that the first three years after the diagnosis are crucial to understanding how fast the disease is going to progress. I was hoping that if I made it to that three-year anniversary I would have a good prognosis, but I feel like I failed. Of course statistics are just statistics, and in all honesty I don’t think my immune system keeps a calendar and counts the days. I’m the one doing this and adding meaning to something that may not have any meaning at all. What is wrong is not my MS (well, apart from everything that’s wrong with it) but my expectations, that were probably too high. Small goals, one day at a time. Keep it simple. I’ll be fine.

And I actually am. I went through this entire relapse in a very rational and collected fashion. My therapist told me that if I were always like this I wouldn’t need therapy anymore. When physical symptoms arise, sometimes mental symptoms like anxiety and dissociation move out of the way because the body needs to keep its cool in order to survive. But I actually have a simpler explanation. I was calm mostly because the whole thing was a déjà vu. It happened pretty much the same way it did in late 2011 when I was diagnosed. Let’s see:

  • Day one: woke up and my vision was weird, though it took me one day to figure out exactly how weird. 2011: right eye with blurred and double vision. 2014: a shadow on my right eye, pain when I move the eye very quickly.
  • Day two: the headaches begin. I was later explained the headaches are an indirect symptom. The brain realizes that there is something wrong with the data the optic nerves are sending, and thus corrects it. Doing so for all the hours we’re awake is literally a pain in the brain.
  • Day three: dizziness and vertigo. Probably an indirect symptom as well. 2011: it still took me more three days to go to the hospital and hear the verdict that I had a nerve paralyzed and that was causing the double vision. 2014: on the third day I just called my neurologist and heard the verdict: the dreaded optic neuritis. The good news: the nerves involved in both cases are different, so it’s likely that my previous lesion in not bigger and that this one is new. Either way, I still fear that in ten years time my vision will be seriously compromised. Let’s hope not. I casually asked my neurologist what would have happened if I hadn’t called and instead let the inflammation run its course. She told me that my vision could have worsened and the remission might not be total, leaving me with permanent damage. So 5 days of methylprednisolone was the best option to make sure everything went back to normal.

Now as for the déjà vus regarding the context in which these two exacerbations occurred:

  • Many people relapse while they’re going through a stressful time in their lives. Not me. I apparently relapse when everything’s fine and I’m feeling stable and quite content with things in my life. I read once that according to studies new lesions form in the brain and spinal cord around seven weeks after a stressful event. The explanation is that stress slows down the immune system. When everything goes back to normal, an overactive immune system like that of those with autoimmune conditions, comes back in full force and starts wreaking havoc. That makes more sense to me if I consider my experience. Back in 2011 the first six months of the year were of non-stop stress. Chronic stress. Then things started to get better and by November I was feeling happy. How weird. I almost had forgotten what happiness was like. And then, much like self-sabotage, it all went down the drain. This time around I spent the month of July struggling with fatigue and worrying about different stuff, and then I slowed down, went away, relaxed, exercised more, reflected on where I was and where I wanted to go next… I wasn’t exactly feeling my happiest me, but I was peaceful, my mind was not at war with anything. And here I am again.
  • On the other hand, while I was feeling relaxed and content, both in 2011 and now I decided to stop daydreaming so much and put my feet on the ground. After all, I live in reality, not in an alternate version my brain likes to idealize. I dream of running away, of getting away from everything that makes me feel stranded. I dream of a life with more freedom. But I also need to focus on the here and now so I might as well stop building castles in the air. Turns out, dissociating seems to be working as a safety blanket for me. Once I threw it out, reality hit me right in the face. Punched me literally in the eye.
  • Both in 2011 and now I had just started reading a book by Haruki Murakami when my vision decided to stop working properly. In 2011 it was 1Q84 and now Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage. This coincidence is almost as surreal as Murakami’s books. I’m actually thinking about writing to him asking him not to write another book for the next ten years, so I won’t relapse.
  • My mom was in utter denial. I’m considering using my mom’s reactions as an indicator of how bad the situation might be. In 2011 she told me I was just stressed (no, mom, I’m not, besides I never heard of stress causing double vision). Now she told me there were a lot of strange viruses out there and that I might have caught something (not when I’m having all these déjà vus, no).
  • As usual, it was my therapist who took my symptoms seriously and nudged me to see a doctor. In 2011 she was harder on me: “You’re going to get out of here and immediately go to the hospital.” This time she just told me, “I think you will find out for yourself soon that it’s best to hear your neurologist’s opinion.” I think I’m getting better at taking care of myself, but it’s still sad that I need someone to encourage me to do so.

Of course, comparing 2011 and 2014, there were some differences too. First let’s have a laugh:

The day before I went to see my neurologist and started on methylprednisolone I was told at my job that I was going to get a raise in recognition of my hard work. So what do I do the day after that? I call in sick. Ha! They are probably having second thoughts on that raise right now. The universe truly works in mysterious ways. (And I love my life.)

Also, this time around my moment of self-pity only lasted about thirty minutes. I let my eyes well up with tears (I actually didn’t let, I just couldn’t help it) while I engaged in some “this isn’t fair, I didn’t do anything wrong, I don’t deserve this disease, neither the amazing people I know with MS, this doesn’t make sense”, etc, etc, etc. But then I realized that, the same way I don’t think my immune system keeps a calendar, I don’t believe it holds a court either. Nor do I think I’m on trial. It just is what it is.

So right now I’m doing what the doctor told me and just resting in between IV treatments. The weather is cloudy here, so it’s good to watch movies, mostly animation, teen movies and comedies. I’m just not in the mood for deeper stuff. Of course being the very sensitive/emotional/hormonal/depressive young woman that I am, I cried in all of them, even the comedies. Yep, that’s me. Sometimes I feel fragile and defenseless like a newborn, but like a newborn I will be kicking and screaming for my life. As soon as I’m “normal” again, I will be back on my active lifestyle, hungry for life, knowledge, growth and experiences.

I will be putting up a fight.

Seeing MS

Dizziness
Dizziness

One of the most frustrating things about living with multiple sclerosis is that most symptoms are invisible and we appear to be well to other people. One day the entire world seems blurred – yet you’ll never know how I am seeing you. The other day I am so tired I can barely stand or listen to people talk – yet you’ll just say I’m not getting enough sleep. And how about those days when my memory took some time off and I can’t remember anything you told me? – you’ll just say I wasn’t paying enough attention, or worse, that I’m a bit dumb. And let’s not talk about those days when my balance is off and I bump into every other object in the room – then I’m just a clumsy little girl.

pain
Pain

I feel ashamed of talking about my little handicaps because people will most likely eye me suspiciously and assume that I’m just trying to get away with responsibilities or work. I had a boyfriend who once suggested I was faking symptoms just to get attention and on another occasion he suggested I was using the disease as an excuse to get what I wanted. This kind of response makes ms patients feel isolated, insecure, misunderstood – and that’s hardly breaking news. If you research a little about multiple sclerosis, either online or the old-fashioned ways, you’ll find lots of people wrote about it.

Hot and Cold
Hot and Cold

For instance, Sandra Amor and Hans Van Noort wrote in their Multiple Sclerosis – The Facts that “symptoms may range from being almost unnoticeable to severe, and anything in between. In fact, quite a few people with MS do not show any clear signs of their condition at all to untrained eyes. Paradoxically, this in itself can be a cause of problems too. Family members and colleagues may sometimes think that complaints may be exaggerated, or even imaginary. Society can sometimes be quite impatient with people who need special attention but still appear to be largely okay from the outside, especially when they are young.” Allison Shadday adds in her MS and Your Feelings, “Unfortunately, society reinforces a stoic stance. We’re taught that it is better to keep our ‘complaints’ to ourselves. But the price we pay is isolation. Keeping up a good front inevitably makes us feel distant and misunderstood by others, rather than accepted and loved, as we so desire.”

Numbness
Numbness

But the truth is, most people don’t care enough to read or research. So when I found out about the Seeing MS project, I thought it was fantastic. The idea is to expose the invisible symptoms, by depicting them in an image. Nine photographers were invited to participate, and anyone else can submit their pictures as well. Where words fail, maybe images can help.

My submissions to the project: http://escharae.wordpress.com/submissions-to-seeing-ms/