I don’t know

Is it crazy to avoid the behaviors that make you crazy? Or is it crazy to medicate so that you can sustain a life that makes you crazy?

Andrew Solomon, The Noonday Demon

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First 2015 reading list

The Wandering Mind – I’ve been talking about dissociation but I never really researched much about it. This is a little introductory book, from daydreaming to severe disorders. I’ll see if it’s worth it. Continue reading

MS: The Facts

31fibAITxuL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_When I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis I felt the need to have a little guide that would sit on my shelf and I could pick up whenever I had doubts about anything or wanted to clarify a specific aspect of the disease. So I found this little book that has served this purpose since I purchased it.

It was released in late September 2012, which means that its information is still relatively up to date (though I expect – and hope – that with more therapies and scientific discoveries emerging it will become outdated it coming years). It’s only 84 pages long so it doesn’t deal with all the subjects with a lot of detail or depth but it gives a very significant overview, in a very accessible language, of everything you may want to look up.

Covered topics include possible causes for ms, the inflammatory process, symptoms, disease progression, diagnosis, social aspects of living with ms, how the immune system works, autoimmunity, treatments available and in development and alternative therapies. It basically covers all relevant topics for people interested in understanding what’s going on and how to manage it all.

One thing that struck me while reading the book was that the authors argue that the immune system of people with ms is normal, contrary to what is usually believed. They point out that brain tissue of people with ms reveals the presence of mild abnormalities and disturbances, and those abnormalities are the ones that call on the immune system cells to attack. This puts the drugs we take in perspective, since they seem to be targeted at the consequence, not the cause. But whatever the causes, I think this book is essential to have a little more understanding of what’s physiologically going on in our bodies.