A story of access – or lack thereof

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For the second year in a row, the World MS Day theme is access. Access may mean a lot of different things, and you can read more about it here, but to me, right now, it means access to the right treatment. So I am going to try to keep the long story short. Continue reading

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The Noonday Demon

transferirMay is mental health awareness month, and I thought I’d post something about this book I read a while back, because I think that pointing people to resources is also a way to raise awareness. This is a book about depression, and it covers pretty much everything on the topic you might want to know, find out, debate or are simply curious about.

We’re in 2015 and I still read online people saying you don’t need to take anything for depression because you can manage it naturally. I witnessed my mother going into an almost catatonic state due to depression and I can guarantee there was no herbal tea, meditation or yoga that could have taken her out of it. Continue reading

What about now?

The last time I really fell head over heels with someone I didn’t feel tired. Me, the one who was always tired and didn’t even know why, found energy where there was none, found ways to continuously pick herself up because body and mind were so light. Does love cure all? No, I don’t think so. But maybe the rush of chemicals released into our bloodstream when we’re in love have protective and anti-inflammatory effects (this is totally unscientific, please don’t quote me) and somehow help mitigate symptoms.

But that was a long time ago. That was before I was diagnosed. Continue reading

Treating Your MS: A User’s Guide to Multiple Sclerosis Medications

Treating your MS HR_book cover jpeg-2I mentioned in my previous post that I wouldn’t be reading non-fiction for a while. However, since I’m in between drugs at the moment and this book came out a little over a month ago, I thought the timing was perfect.

I haven’t been taking anything for MS since February, and right now what I’m going to take next remains a huge question mark. I started on Avonex when I was diagnosed but soon it became clear that interferons are a big no for me due to side effects. I moved to Copaxone but disease progression as seen on MRI made doctors consider other possibilities. Continue reading